Transition 2012 Part 1: Reign of Lynx Review

It has been almost 2 year since the Lynx reigns my notebook. I like Lynx, it’s stable, fast boot-up, fast shut-down, easy to configure, etc. Lucid Lynx is an Ubuntu linux distro version 10.04. I use this system for my daily usage at home after work. Sometimes I use my home system to do my office work. In office I use Windows XP and Windows 7 system, and most applications that I use in office won’t be able to work in my linux system. So, I use virtual machine to do my work. In this case I use VMWare, instead of VirtualBox. There are several reasons why I use VMWare rather than VirtualBox. First, most of my colleague use VMWare; second, I feel VirtualBox is still unstable; and third, USB support in VMWare is better than VirtualBox.

In term of internet browser, I still prefer Firefox, it’s just because I feel more comfortable using it rather than other linux browser. Firefox supports many add-ons and plug-ins. Other than that, most of my bookmarks are in Firefox. Chromium is my second browser. Chromium is a good browser, the look is very simple, fast, and I can install chrome-based application.

In term of display, I have installed compiz and Avant Window Manager (AWN). The compiz allows me to run animation special-effect on my system. It’s really nice, even though I don’t set it at full capacity. While AWN allows me to show icon launcher on any side of the screen, but I prefer left-side. Below is a screen-shot of my compiz capability and AWN.

There are several applications that I use very often.

  • Home Bank, a simple-personal accounting system, it tracks my income and expense, including my credit cards. I think it’s one of the best application for non-accounting person like me.
  • GCStar is an application to store my movie collection. It’s able to retrieve movie information from the internet. The good thing of GCStar, it’s not just for movie, but can be used for book or music collection as well. A recommended application for collectors.
  • SMPlayer is my most favourite movie player. It can run any movie format as long, as you have the codec, without a glitch.
  • Disk Usage Analyser is an application that allows me to check how much space that my data has occupied my harddisk. It’s a default application from Ubuntu, but it’s very very useful. I think Windows system also need this application by default. By using this application, I can pinpoint which folder that has occupied my harddisk the most.
  • Transmission is a downloader application with a torrent technology. Usually I use this application to download files from the internet. It’s very good, and it has never given me any problem.
  • Terminal Server Client and TeamViewer are vnc-like application. I can use them to remote to a server or desktop and control them. They have helped me a lot to do my job.
  • Geany is the best of the lightest IDE. It helped me a lot to do some programming works.
  • Brasero is a DVD writer for Gnome. It’s an fine application. It can do the job, but sometimes it took almost an hour just to burn a DVD, and sometimes the result is not copied very well. If there is another DVD burner application, I’m willing to try it, as long as it’s a Gnome application.
  • The last but not least is Wine, an application that allows me to run Windows application on my linux system, especially my games.  🙂

This Lynx is one of my best system of all. I still feel sad to overthrown Lynx from my notebook. But, I hope the next system, Pangolin, can give me a better performance than Lynx.

Thank you and good bye, Lynx.

Ubuntu Kernel Update Breaks NVidia Driver

A day after the successful installation of Ubuntu 10.04, I ran recommended update of the operating system. One of the update was for its kernel. Because of the Nvidia driver was installed into the system’s kernel, so I thought I had to prepare for the worst.

After the update finished and I restarted the system, my worry became reality, the NVidia driver was missing, so even though I still able to go into Gnome, the screen resolution backed to the standard resolution. When I used Linux Mint, this problem was never happened, maybe it was because last time I used NVidia driver that came with the distro through Envy application. But, for current driver I downloaded manually from the NVidia website.

According to a thread in ubuntuforums.org (I forgot the address) I just need to reinstall the NVidia driver. So, I did it, and it works.

Thanks, God. Luckily, it’s easy…

A Lynx Conquered My Notebook

Since the first time I know Linux 10 years ago I have tried several Linux distro. The first Linux distro that I used was Mandrake (the former of Mandriva), and then followed by openSuse, SimplyMepis, Ubuntu, PCLinuxOS, and the last was Linux Mint, up to last week. From those distros only PCLinuxOS 2007, Linux Mint 4, 6, and 8 that I used daily on my notebook. I am happy with the performance of both distros, especially Linux Mint. It’s very user friendly.

But, last week I decided to install a new distro version. I tried the live cd of Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and Kubuntu. Live distro that I tried for first time was Ubuntu 10.04, and I already faced have a problem. The live distro could not boot properly, it showed a blank screen. Then, I tried with Kubuntu and Linux Mint, all of them had the same problem. An obvious result because all of the distros are based on Ubuntu. After google-ing for several hours, I found out from a forum that the cause was “nouveau”, an open-source driver for NVidia. According to the website I need to disable the driver by adding an option command into the grub command.

nouveau.modeset=0

So, the grub command became:

/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-21-generic root=UUID=2b69f855-de8b-461b-8f8b-02e3bf7d1142 ro nouveau.modeset=0  quiet splash

By using this command, I was able to boot into the live distro, not only Ubuntu, but also Kubuntu and Linux Mint.

Linux Mint 9 Isadora looked similar to its previous version, but I was impressed with the Ubuntu and Kubuntu. I read some reviews for Ubuntu and Kubuntu, looked like Ubuntu received a lot of praises, but Kubuntu received some negative critics. So, it was decided to install Ubuntu 10.04 64-bit Lucid Lynx into my Sony Vaio VPCCW26FG.

The Ubuntu installation was very smooth, I didn’t get any trouble when installing it. After installation I rebooted to my new OS by disabling the “nouveau” driver in the grub command. And, then I amended the “/etc/default/grub” to disable “nouveau” driver, so I don’t need to amend the grub command every time I boot. In the file I put:

# Disable Nouveau driver
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=”nouveau.modeset=0″

And then I ran the command below from terminal:

sudo update-grub

I restarted the OS and I could access Lucid Lynx successfully without needed to amend the grub command.

Unlike my previous Linux Mint, Lucid Lynx is able to detect my wireless, so I just need to connect to my wireless modem and typed the password. For addition, I needed to change the wireless setting in my Network Manager to connect automatically every time I log in.

Everything works fine in my new OS, except my NVidia GeForce GT 330m. In order to settle this, I followed instruction from the forum. I downloaded NVidia driver from NVidia website, and then I ran the command below to go to command line and disable the Gnome.

sudo service gdm stop

And, then install the downloaded NVidia driver. After the installation I added 2 lines into “Device” section in “/etc/xorg.conf”:

Option         “ConnectedMonitor” “DFP-0”
Option         “CustomEDID” “DFP-0: /proc/acpi/video/NGFX/LCD/EDID”

After this step I rebooted the OS and, foila, my screen resolution became “1600×900”.

Mission completed ! 😀
Now time for restoring my favorite applications.

Special thanks to “TheRawGod” from “ubuntuforum.org”.