Transition 2012 Part 2: Pangolin Rules My Notebook (Officially)

It took about half-an-hour to install Pangolin on my notebook, as usual from Ubuntu. Yup, It’s a clean install. I removed the Lynx and installed Pangolin. I saw from the internet, many people tried to upgrade, but took hours to finish, and sometimes broke some already running well application. So, I prefer avoid this problem.

Unlike Lynx, Pangolin is using another desktop environment, even though still based on Gnome. Pangolin is using Unity, as seen below.

It’s totally different from previous desktop environment. It looks nice. It’s very nicely done. But, different desktop environment means different ways of doing things.

There is no more main menu on the top bar, even though on the left side of the top bar looks the same as before. Now the menu is in the Ubuntu button on the top-left corner of the screen. Once click on the button, a panel will be shown, which is showing latest application or files used, list of installed applications, list of music, and list of videos. On the window itself, there is a search box for me to find applications or, maybe, ever opened files. It is similar to Gnome-Do on my previous system, and I think I like Gnome-Do better. Anyway, it’s a good improvement.

On the left side of the screen there is a launcher bar, which holds selected applications for quick run the application without finding it in the application list. It remind me to my AWN on my previous system. So, that’s fine for me. The one that I surprise me (in a good way) is the ability of the launcher bar and all other on-screen notifications to adapt to the wallpaper colour. I like this functionality very much. 🙂

My impression for my Pangolin is good enough for now. The real test will start when I’m installing my applications, and how good my applications run on top of Pangolin.

So, King Pangolin, congratulations for your succession. Rule wisely and I hope the best from you. 🙂

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Articles Collection of Feb’09

These are the collection of useful articles about Linux/Open source, that I collected in Feb 2009:

  1. 10 Songbird add-ons for a better audio player
  2. 12 of the best games for your Linux netbook
  3. Linux layout for Windows users
  4. 6 Free Blogging Clients for Linux Users
  5. How To Create A Great Window Maker Desktop
  6. Installing Windows XP As A KVM Guest On Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop
  7. 17 Awesome Linux Applicaitons to Improve your Productivity
  8. 10 free RAW image tools for Linux
  9. Free and Open Source Finance/Accounting Software for Linux
  10. A Unix Utility You Should Know About: Netcat
  11. Automate Tasks With Cron
  12. The Perfect Server – Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) [ISPConfig 2]
  13. 25 Tutorials To Get You Started With Blender
  14. Easy Steps to Rip a DVD to ISO in Ubuntu 8.10
  15. Setting up UNIX file systems
  16. 10 iptables rules to help secure your Linux box
  17. How to Kill a Running Process in Ubuntu (or any Linux distro)
  18. Use netstat to See Internet Connections
  19. Connecting to Windows servers from GNU/Linux using pyNeighborhood
  20. Linux forensics – Part 1: Helix
  21. Linux forensics – Part 2: Protech
  22. Disable GNOME Automounting
  23. Eye Candy: Pimping the Gnome Desktop on Ubuntu
  24. Fictional Air Combat 0.1.3
  25. The Beginner’s Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution
  26. 15 Essential Ubuntu Productivity Apps
  27. The Adventures of Rick Rocket released for Linux!
  28. Giving kids a fresh start with Qimo Linux
  29. Things You Need To Know To Become An Apt Guru
  30. 8 Beautiful Themes For Enlightenment WM
  31. Basic Linux Security for Beginners
  32. Installing A “Full” Linux Distro On A USB Stick [How-To]
  33. Prevent Firefox from Hogging Memory When Minimized

Restore Menu Button in Linux Mint

Last week one of my friend sms me, he said the Menu button had gone from the panel… Ooooo… He uses Linux Mint 6 as the OS. Actually, it’s the first time I heard a Menu button gone from the panel.

But, I remembered that in Gnome icons in panel are applets or shortcuts. So, I told him to right-click on the taskbar and click “Add to Panel…”, and then added “mintMenu” into the panel. And… the problem solved.

add-to-panel

Articles Collection of Aug’08

These are the collection of useful articles about Linux/Open source, that I collected in August 2008:

  1. InfoWorld announces our 2008 Best of Open Source Awards
  2. 7 Best Linux Distributions for Multimedia Enthusiasts
  3. The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key
  4. 28 Coolest Firefox About:Config Tricks
  5. Integrating Linux into the SME
  6. 10 things you didn’t know you could do in Ubuntu
  7. Top 5 Linux Migration Tips For Small Offices
  8. 10 “Really Cool” Icon Sets for Ubuntu/GNOME Desktop