Articles Collection of May’09

These are the collection of useful articles about Linux/Open source, that I collected in May 2009:

  1. 3 Ways to Record Your Linux Desktop
  2. How to set the date in Linux
  3. How to securely clean up data on a hard disk on Linux
  4. 20 Ubuntu Derivatives You Should Know About
  5. Store passwords with pwsafe
  6. Beyond Firefox: 10 Other Great Linux Browsers
  7. 7 E17 Linux & BSD Distributions
  8. 8 Beautiful Conky Desktop Monitor Setup
  9. 10 handy Firefox about:config hacks
  10. 10 Steps for Basic Linux Desktop Security
  11. 10 Free Linux Ebooks For Beginners
  12. Best Linux distros for power users, gamers, newbies and more
  13. 10 Awesome Icon Sets for Ubuntu/GNOME Desktop
  14. 10 Games That Will Turn your Linux into a WarMachine
  15. 5 Easy Wine Front-ends for Linux
  16. Nixie’s Linux Haxor Quickie: Setting up File Sharing in Linux with Samba!
  17. 12 Worthy Alternative Browsers for Linux
  18. Using the Bash complete Command
  19. 10 Free Apps that Turn your Ubuntu into Video Studio
  20. Ubuntu Softwares – Not Just Another Top 5 List
  21. How To Convert Any Video File Format Under Linux
  22. 8 Essential OpenOffice Extensions
  23. 9 Ways to Make Linux More Secure
  24. 15+ programs you don’t have to miss when you switch to Linux
  25. 100 open source gems – part 1
  26. 100 open source gems – part 2
  27. Access Remote GUI Programs Using SSH Forwarding
  28. EarCandy 0.4 rules !
  29. Install Windows Games in Linux with PlayOnLinux …
  30. Project that should be integrated into the Gnome Desktop
  31. How to Import Data From Spreadsheet into OpenOffice.org Database
  32. Portable VirtualBox
  33. Install any linux on USB flash drive
  34. Gnome desktop overhaul guide
  35. How to Create a Multi Part Tar File with Linux
  36. Use an ISO as if it were a real CD
  37. How to: add features to Firefox with Mozilla’s new Jetpack
  38. Getting to know Gnote
  39. 15 Beautiful KDM Themes
  40. Introduction to fstab
  41. Another superb collection of Linux games
  42. Top 10 Apps that Boosts Ubuntu’s User Experience
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Map Windows Drive in Ubuntu

Today when I was going to copy my data into my library drive (FAT32), I noticed that my Ubuntu didn’t map it. So, I was thinking about the “/etc/fstab”. I opened the file, and yes, all of my Windows drive was not mapped in the “fstab”. I tried to add it manually with my own knowledge, but after restart it didn’t work. The drive still was not mapped.

And then, I googled in Ubuntu website, and I found these:

After read these websites I install “ntfs-config” and then I chose the drives that I wanted to map. After that, I added:

/dev/sda7 /media/LIBRARY vfat defaults,user,exec,uid=1000,gid=100,umask=000 0 0

into the “/etc/fstab”.

I also noticed to apply the “fstab”, I don’t need to restart my computer, but just run:

sudo mount -a

in the terminal.

After I did those steps, at last my Ubuntu can read my Windows drive…

I’m really grateful for those who contribute their knowledge in the internet. I hope I can do the same… 🙂